Invited Speakers

Prof Anna De Fina

Prof Anna De Fina

Anna De Fina is Professor of Italian Language and Linguistics in the Italian Department and Affiliated Faculty with the Linguistics Department at Georgetown University. Her interests and publications focus on identity, narrative, migration, and super-diversity. She is co-editor of the series Encounters (Multilingual Matters) and Narrative, discourse and Interaction (Routledge).

She has published 9 volumes and 50 between chapters and articles in internationally renowned journals. Her publications include the edited volume Diversity and Super-diversity. Sociocultural Linguistic Perspectives (with D. Ikizoglu and J. Wegner, Georgetown University Press, 2017), Identity in Narrative: A Study of Immigrant Discourse (John Benjamins, 2003), Analyzing Narratives (coauthored with Alexandra Georgakopoulou, Cambridge University Press, 2012) and the Handbook of Narrative Analysis (coedited with Alexandra Georgakopoulou, Wiley, 2015).

Prof Tinatin Margalitadze

Prof Tinatin Margalitadze

Tinatin Margalitadze – Professor of Lexicography at the Institute of Western European Languages and Literature, Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Georgia,Research director of the Lexicographic Centre of the University,Member of the Executive Board of EURALEX (European Association for  Lexicography),Organizer and chair of XVII EURALEX International Congress (Tbilisi, 2016),Member of State Committee for the Enhancement of Bilingual Lexicography in Georgia.Editor in chief and publisher of the Comprehensive English-Georgian Online Dictionary (www.dict.ge).

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Editor of the English-Georgian Military Online Dictionary ( http://mil.dict.ge), English-Georgian Biology Online Dictionary (http://bio.dict.ge) and English-Georgian Technical Online Dictionary (http://techdict.ge).

Supervisor of MA (since 2009) and PhD programs (since 2011) in lexicography at Tbilisi State University.

www.margaliti.com

Prof John Read

Prof John Read

John Read is a Professor in Applied Language Studies at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He has taught EAP, TESOL and Applied Linguistics in institutions in New Zealand, the USA and Singapore. His primary scholarly interests are in testing English for academic and professional purposes and second language vocabulary assessment. Recently he published two books: Assessing English proficiency for university study (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) and Post-admission language assessment of university students (edited; Springer, 2016). He has been editor of the international research journal Language Testing (2002-2006) and President of the International Language Testing Association (2011-2012).
Prof Laura Downing

Prof Laura Downing

Laura J. Downing is the Professor of African Languages at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Her central research interest since her dissertation (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 1990) has been the prosody of Bantu languages, including prosodic morphology and the phonology-syntax interface.

Her work on these topics has been published in a variety of journals, such as Africana Linguistica, Journal of African Languages and Linguistics, Lingua, Natural Language and Linguistic Theory and Phonology, as well as numerous anthologies. She is the author of Canonical Forms in Prosodic Morphology (Oxford University Press); co-editor, with Prof.

Annie Rialland, of an anthology on Intonation in African Tone Languages (Mouton de Gruyter); and co-author, with Prof. Al Mtenje, of the Phonology of Chichewa, to be published by Oxford University Press in June 2017.

Dubinsky Stanley

Dubinsky Stanley

Ethnolinguistic factors are becoming increasingly apparent in global conflicts in the 21st century, and must be taken into account alongside religious, ideological, economic, environmental, and resource bases of conflicts. Ethnolinguistic nationalism is resurgent in the face of globalism, and centuries’ old ethnolinguistic rivalries of Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia (temporarily papered over by European colonialism and UN imposed post-colonial borders) have once again come bursting forth.

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This talk will (i) review the content of a forthcoming book by William D. Davies and Stanley Dubinsky, titled Language Conflict and Language Rights (Cambridge University Press), including a typology of language conflicts introduced in the book; (ii) discuss the structure of an undergraduate course based on the book; and (iii) describe plans for a Language Conflict Data Archive which the authors have proposed to create.

This book is intended to provide a fundamental understanding of the issues surrounding language rights and how these are integral to human rights in general, as well as an individual’s definition of personal and cultural identity. It then explores language conflicts in a variety of nations, and shows how those conflicts have affected the rights of certain groups to use their own language, the groups’ efforts to secure those rights, and efforts to deny those rights through legislation and other actions. Through careful and linguistically informed presentations of these matters, the book critically examines the significant intellectual issues underlying what can be an emotionally-charged subject. As a means of unravelling the complexity of the issue, the book proposes a “Typology of Language Conflicts”, and divides such into the following five categories: (i) indigenous minorities. (ii) geo-political minorities, (iii) minorities of migration, (iv) intra-linguistic (dialectal) minorities, and (v) competition for linguistic dominance.

The course, developed in conjunction with the book and currently taught at the University of South Carolina and the University of Iowa, is designed to serve undergraduate students across a wide range of disciplines, including History, International Business, International Relations, Journalism, Law, Linguistics, Philosophy, and Political Science. On the University of South Carolina campus, the course satisfies a University-wide requirement in Values, Ethics, and Social Responsibility.

The authors further propose to build, using the few dozen historical and contemporaneous cases presented in the book and in our classes, a searchable database of such conflicts worldwide. Conflicts would be geo-located on a world map, and information about each would include the location of the conflict, the ethnic groups and languages involved, and the category of the conflict. Each conflict entry would provide a synopsis of the history and linguistic background for the conflict, bibliographical resources. Database filters would allow users to examine subsets of language conflicts, sorted by type, language family, etc. Contributions to the data base would be curated, to maintain standards of accuracy and readability, and might easily grow to include several hundred cases, providing a public resource for anyone studying the topic.